ancient rare coins

  1. Who Were The Thracians?

    Who Were The Thracians?

    When talking about groups of people in ancient times some people wonder "who were the Thracians?" It is curious that many don't know much about them even though they were an Indo-European people who dominated a large area of Eastern Europe. They inhabited what today is modern day Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece. In fact, they occupied this area for much of antiquity.

    We can find some of the earliest literary references of the Thracians from the Iliad. The epic poem of Homer referenced the Trojan War and King Rhesus who was a local Thracian ruler. The problem about Thracians is that they were divided between multiple tribes. They all had their own tribal identity and basically did things differently. Interestingly, The Thracians did not describe themselves by name. The term Thrace and Thracians were names given to them by the Greeks.

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  2. Thrace influenced by Greece?

    Thrace influenced by Greece?

    Was Thrace influenced by Greece & the Macedonian Empire? It is a fact, Thrace was conquered by Philip II, king of Macedonia. This occurred in the 4th century BC. Once Philip the II died Thrace became a part of the great kingdom of Alexander the Great. Following Alexander’s death, his empire was divided among his generals, who established independent kingdoms including Thrace.

     

    Lysimachus, who reigned from 323 to 281 BCE, was the general who succeeded Alexander as the ruler of Thrace. According to Herodotus, an ancient Greek historian, Thrace was highly influenced by Greece and the Macedonian Empire's culture. But, were they?

    Yes, Thracian coinage gave homage to the once great leader of the Macedonian Empire. The Thracians under the leadership of Lysimachus used Alexander's portrait on the front of their coins. However, on the back

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  3. The Cruelest Roman Emperor

    The Cruelest Roman Emperor

    Roman Emperor Caligula is remembered as being the cruelest roman emperor. No one can say exactly why he was so cruel. Some speculate, that it was because he fell ill of syphilis 6 month into his reign. Whatever the reason, he never recovered mentally and became a ruthless leader.

     

    Caligula's cruelty lasted during his four-year reign from 37-41 AD. In fact, he became so ruthless that no one was safe, including his family. Some even refer to Caligula as the mad emperor. In short, his cruelty, sadism, extravagance, and sexual perversion was nothing short of the actions of an insane tyrant. For instance, he made his horse a member of the senate and slept with or killed every member of his own family.

    There are others who believe Caligula's excessive cruelty is exaggerated

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  4. The First International Currency

    The First International Currency

    The world’s first coins were minted in ancient Lydia. Lydia's King Croesus became the first ruler to separate gold from other metals. He issued the world's first pure gold and pure silver coins. The Persian Empire, also known as the Achaemenid Empire, took up the idea of coinage upon defeating King Croesus in 547 B.C.. However, it wasn't until Alexander the Great of the Macedonian Empire, who conquered the Persian Empire, that the first international currency evolved. In fact, some believe that Alexander was the father of the first international currency.

    Alexander ascended to the throne in 336 BC following the assassination of his father Philip II. He became king at the very young age of 20. In addition, Alexander adopted the Attic coinage standard. Unfortunately, Alexander spent his ruling years conducting lengthy military campaigns and really didn't get to enjoy his conquest much. He was always too busy conquering more lands throughout Western Asia and Egypt.

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  5. The command to have Jesus Christ crucified

    The command to have Jesus Christ crucified

    Pontius Pilate was Governor of Judea from 26-36 AD under the Roman emperor Tiberius. He is one of the most infamous men in history because he gave the command to have Jesus Christ crucified.

    The New Testament describes Pontius Pilate as a wavering judge. It says that Pilate initially exonerated Jesus before bending to the will of the crowd, and condemning him to death. But non-Biblical sources paint a much darker picture of the Governor of Judea. His reign was corrupt and full of bribery. Although this was typical behavior for a Roman Ruler, Pilate was more ruthless than others as he also willfully defied the Jewish people's traditions.

     

    Pontius Pilate Bronze Prutah

     

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  6. What is the largest ancient gold coin?

    What is the largest ancient gold coin?

    Many customers ask us, "What is the largest ancient gold coin?" We tell them, you’ve come to the right place! Only one ancient gold coin struck holds that title. The Gold Octodrachm was by far the largest gold coin ever struck in the ancient world. These heavy weights were a most common denomination of its day. Importantly, other large denominations like the tetradrachm (four drachms), the pentadrachm (five drachms) were also common. However, the Octodrachm (an eight-drachm coin) was the largest.

     

    Gold Octodrachms were struck over 2,300 years ago. They were produced during the Hellenistic period in Ptolemaic Egypt. No other kingdom or empire in the ancient world comes close to producing such a large gold coin. Above all, Ancient Egypt was known to be a country of r

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  7. Alexander The Great Silver Drachm

    Alexander The Great Silver Drachm
    Alexander The Great Silver Drachm in Holder

    This Alexander The Great Silver Drachm is a beauty! Few names resonate in history like that of  General Alexander the Great of Macedon.  Even today 2,350 years after his death Coinage issued under Alexander are highly desirable and are sought after by all sorts of collectors.

    A Silver Drachm Like this...Will Sell Quickly!

    We are pleased to offer this remarkably high end silver drachm graded by NGC Ancients. Because it has been certified in choice mint state condition, it is highly desirable. It also has received the fine style designation, which implies it to be of the highest artistic quality. Furthermore, this particular coin is known to be a lifetime issue. This means it was struck while Alexander was still alive. Coins that were issued after

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  8. What is a Gold Aureus?

    What is a Gold Aureus?

    A gold coin of ancient Rome

     

    What is a Gold Aureus? The Julius Caesar Gold Aureus was a gold coin of ancient Rome originally valued at 25 pure Silver Denarii. From the 1st century BC to the beginning of the 4th century AD the aureus was commonly struck. It later was replaced by the Solidus. This gold Aureus was struck Caesar during the Roman Republican period under Julius Caesar by Praetor A. Hirtius.

     

    The aureus was heavier than the same size denarius because gold is more dense than silver. Before Julius Caesar became emperor of Rome the gold aureus wasn't very common. It was Caesar's extravagant spending and trying to gain favor with the social elitist that

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  9. What Persian Darics were used for.

    What Persian Darics were used for.

    An ancient Persian Gold Daric is a high-purity gold piece and weighs approximately 8.4 grams. This weight is based on an ancient weight standard.

     

    The Daric was also referred to as a Babylonian shekel. It was called a shekel because it was equivalent to one month's pay for a mercenary foot soldier. We know what Persian Darics were used for. Persian Darics were some of the first coins ever used as currency. Currency was a new concept, because in ancient times bartering was the norm.

     

    One daric could be exchanged for 20 silver sigloi. This was a daric's silver currency counterpart.

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