Ancient Coins

  1. Should You Invest in Ancient Coins?

    ancient coin

    If you’ve shopped with Austin Rare Coins & Bullion before, you’re likely well on your way to generating top-notch returns from precious metal investments. But what if you’re interested in the exceptionally rare? That’s where our ancient coins come in, which are an exciting opportunity for investors and collectors alike. In this blog, our team is going to share why acquiring ancient coins might be the right move for you, so read on and check out our store to begin!

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  2. GRECO-BACTRIAN KINGDOM

    GRECO-BACTRIAN KINGDOM

    Many ancient coin investors do not know very much about the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom founded in 256 BC. Who knew this Persian area was once as a Hellenistic-era Greek state? Surprisingly, known as the "land of a thousand golden cities". In fact, the capital Bactra was one of the largest and richest cities of the ancient world.

    This ancient kingdom covered what is today Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan. It also covered parts of Iran and Pakistan. It is fair to say it covered most of the Indian subcontinent. Bactria covered the eastern most part of Alexander The Great's conquered territory.

    Gerneral Seleucus

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  3. Who Were The Thracians?

    Who Were The Thracians?

    When talking about groups of people in ancient times some people wonder "who were the Thracians?" It is curious that many don't know much about them even though they were an Indo-European people who dominated a large area of Eastern Europe. They inhabited what today is modern day Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece. In fact, they occupied this area for much of antiquity.

    We can find some of the earliest literary references of the Thracians from the Iliad. The epic poem of Homer referenced the Trojan War and King Rhesus who was a local Thracian ruler. The problem about Thracians is that they were divided between multiple tribes. They all had their own tribal identity and basically did things differently. Interestingly, The Thracians did not describe themselves by name. The term Thrace and Thracians were names given to them by the Greeks.

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  4. Thrace influenced by Greece?

    Thrace influenced by Greece?

    Was Thrace influenced by Greece & the Macedonian Empire? It is a fact, Thrace was conquered by Philip II, king of Macedonia. This occurred in the 4th century BC. Once Philip the II died Thrace became a part of the great kingdom of Alexander the Great. Following Alexander’s death, his empire was divided among his generals, who established independent kingdoms including Thrace.

     

    Lysimachus, who reigned from 323 to 281 BCE, was the general who succeeded Alexander as the ruler of Thrace. According to Herodotus, an ancient Greek historian, Thrace was highly influenced by Greece and the Macedonian Empire's culture. But, were they?

    Yes, Thracian coinage gave homage to the once great leader of the Macedonian Empire. The Thracians under the leadership of Lysimachus used Alexander's portrait on the front of their coins. However, on the back

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  5. Thrace influenced by Greece?

    Thrace influenced by Greece?

    Was Thrace influenced by Greece & the Macedonian Empire? It is a fact, Thrace was conquered by Philip II, king of Macedonia. This occurred in the 4th century BC. Once Philip the II died Thrace became a part of the great kingdom of Alexander the Great. Following Alexander’s death, his empire was divided among his generals, who established independent kingdoms including Thrace.

    Lysimachus, who reigned from 323 to 281 BCE, was the general who succeeded Alexander as the ruler of Thrace. According to Herodotus, an ancient Greek historian, Thrace was highly influenced by Greece and the Macedonian Empire's culture. But, were they?

    Yes, Thracian coinage gave homage to the once great leader of the Macedonian Empire. The Thracians under the leadership of Lysimachus used Alexander's portrait on the front of their coins. However, on the back "Lysimachus n

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  6. Tiberius II was a good emperor

    Tiberius II was a good emperor

    As far as the history of rulers of the Byzantine Empire, Tiberius II was a good emperor. Tiberius II ruled as an Eastern Roman emperor from 574 to 582. He ruled Byzantine Empire under the Justinian dynasty and proved himself to be a capable administrator that was well loved by his people.

     

    During the Justinian Dynasty Tiberius II rose to power in 574 when Justin II started to have a mental breakdown. Justin the II had adopted Tiberius as his own son and proclaimed him Caesar. In fact, in 578 the dying Justin II gave Tiberius the title of Augustus and becoming co-emperor alongside him. Tiberius became sole ruler less than two weeks later. Subsequently, Tiberius took the regnal name of "Constantine" under which he reigned until his death.  

     

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  7. The Cruelest Roman Emperor

    The Cruelest Roman Emperor

    Roman Emperor Caligula is remembered as being the cruelest roman emperor. No one can say exactly why he was so cruel. Some speculate, that it was because he fell ill of syphilis 6 month into his reign. Whatever the reason, he never recovered mentally and became a ruthless leader.

     

    Caligula's cruelty lasted during his four-year reign from 37-41 AD. In fact, he became so ruthless that no one was safe, including his family. Some even refer to Caligula as the mad emperor. In short, his cruelty, sadism, extravagance, and sexual perversion was nothing short of the actions of an insane tyrant. For instance, he made his horse a member of the senate and slept with or killed every member of his own family.

    There are others who believe Caligula's excessive cruelty is exaggerated

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  8. The First International Currency

    The First International Currency

    The world’s first coins were minted in ancient Lydia. Lydia's King Croesus became the first ruler to separate gold from other metals. He issued the world's first pure gold and pure silver coins. The Persian Empire, also known as the Achaemenid Empire, took up the idea of coinage upon defeating King Croesus in 547 B.C.. However, it wasn't until Alexander the Great of the Macedonian Empire, who conquered the Persian Empire, that the first international currency evolved. In fact, some believe that Alexander was the father of the first international currency.

    Alexander ascended to the throne in 336 BC following the assassination of his father Philip II. He became king at the very young age of 20. In addition, Alexander adopted the Attic coinage standard. Unfortunately, Alexander spent his ruling years conducting lengthy military campaigns and really didn't get to enjoy his conquest much. He was always too busy conquering more lands throughout Western Asia and Egypt.

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  9. King Croesus Renowned Wealth

    King Croesus Renowned Wealth

    King Croesus renowned wealth became synonymous with his own name. The saying "rich as Croesus" originated in reference to his absurd affluence. Subsequently, Croesus reign became associated with the invention of coins as currency. Before Croesus became King, his father Alyattes had already started to mint various types of non-standardized coins. However, Croesus took it one step further. By developing an innovative refining process and standardizing the specific sizes as well as the purity for general circulation, King Croesus advanced both silver and gold.

     

    In other words, Croesus created intrinsic value deriving from a certain quantity of gold or

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  10. Biblical-Era Judean Bronze Prutahs

    Biblical-Era Judean Bronze Prutahs

    Mark 12:42, 44

     

    New Testament has reference to Biblical-Era Judean Bronze Prutahs coins. These coins had a more common name due to a very well known biblical story.

    42 And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.

     

    44 For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

     

     

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