Ancient Roman Coins

  1. Who Were The Thracians?

    Who Were The Thracians?

    When talking about groups of people in ancient times some people wonder "who were the Thracians?" It is curious that many don't know much about them even though they were an Indo-European people who dominated a large area of Eastern Europe. They inhabited what today is modern day Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece. In fact, they occupied this area for much of antiquity.

    We can find some of the earliest literary references of the Thracians from the Iliad. The epic poem of Homer referenced the Trojan War and King Rhesus who was a local Thracian ruler. The problem about Thracians is that they were divided between multiple tribes. They all had their own tribal identity and basically did things differently. Interestingly, The Thracians did not describe themselves by name. The term Thrace and Thracians were names given to them by the Greeks.

    Read more »
  2. Tiberius II was a good emperor

    Tiberius II was a good emperor

    As far as the history of rulers of the Byzantine Empire, Tiberius II was a good emperor. Tiberius II ruled as an Eastern Roman emperor from 574 to 582. He ruled Byzantine Empire under the Justinian dynasty and proved himself to be a capable administrator that was well loved by his people.

     

    During the Justinian Dynasty Tiberius II rose to power in 574 when Justin II started to have a mental breakdown. Justin the II had adopted Tiberius as his own son and proclaimed him Caesar. In fact, in 578 the dying Justin II gave Tiberius the title of Augustus and becoming co-emperor alongside him. Tiberius became sole ruler less than two weeks later. Subsequently, Tiberius took the regnal name of "Constantine" under which he reigned until his death.  

     

    Read more »
  3. The Cruelest Roman Emperor

    The Cruelest Roman Emperor

    Roman Emperor Caligula is remembered as being the cruelest roman emperor. No one can say exactly why he was so cruel. Some speculate, that it was because he fell ill of syphilis 6 month into his reign. Whatever the reason, he never recovered mentally and became a ruthless leader.

     

    Caligula's cruelty lasted during his four-year reign from 37-41 AD. In fact, he became so ruthless that no one was safe, including his family. Some even refer to Caligula as the mad emperor. In short, his cruelty, sadism, extravagance, and sexual perversion was nothing short of the actions of an insane tyrant. For instance, he made his horse a member of the senate and slept with or killed every member of his own family.

    There are others who believe Caligula's excessive cruelty is exaggerated

    Read more »
  4. Biblical-Era Judean Bronze Prutahs

    Biblical-Era Judean Bronze Prutahs

    Mark 12:42, 44

     

    New Testament has reference to Biblical-Era Judean Bronze Prutahs coins. These coins had a more common name due to a very well known biblical story.

    42 And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.

     

    44 For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

     

     

    Read more »
  5. Roman Emperor Trajan Decius

    Roman Emperor Trajan Decius

    Gaius Messius Quintus Trajanus Decius, commonly referred to as Trajan Decius, ruled Ancient Rome from 249 to 251 AD. Roman Emperor Trajan Decius wanted to restore Rome to its former glory and ancient traditions. Therefore, he decreed the Decius' edict. This was a proclamation for Empire-wide loyalty. The Decius' edict meant that all Roman citizens needed to make a sacrifice to Rome's gods or face torture, execution and seizure of assets. 

     

    Moreover, Christian belief would not allow for them to worship any other god. As a result, Emperor Trajan Decius cracked down harshly on those he believed were undermining the ancient traditions of Rome. Consequently, they were persecuted and tortured. Even Pope Fabian was killed! By the end of Decius'

    Read more »
  6. The command to have Jesus Christ crucified

    The command to have Jesus Christ crucified

    Pontius Pilate was Governor of Judea from 26-36 AD under the Roman emperor Tiberius. He is one of the most infamous men in history because he gave the command to have Jesus Christ crucified.

    The New Testament describes Pontius Pilate as a wavering judge. It says that Pilate initially exonerated Jesus before bending to the will of the crowd, and condemning him to death. But non-Biblical sources paint a much darker picture of the Governor of Judea. His reign was corrupt and full of bribery. Although this was typical behavior for a Roman Ruler, Pilate was more ruthless than others as he also willfully defied the Jewish people's traditions.

     

    Pontius Pilate Bronze Prutah

     

    Read more »
  7. Was Marcus Aurelius on a coin?

    Was Marcus Aurelius on a coin?

    When people ask "Was Marcus Aurelius on a coin?" The answer is a simple - yes. In fact, most Roman emperors were commemorated by having their likeness on a coin. Marcus Aurelius was a Roman emperor from 161 to 180. He was known for continuing Rome's prosperity and dealing with German tribes on the northern borders. He was also known as a philosopher. Above all, he is actually best remembered for his "rule driven by reason."

     

    Marcus Aurelius was the last of the rulers known as the Five Good Emperors. The last emperor of the Pax Romana. This was an age of relative peace and stability for the Roman Empire. What made Marcus so famous was his guidance by wisdom and virtue. This separated Marcus from the majority of past leaders all the way to the present. 

    Across all the centuries Marcus Aurelius is perhaps one of the most

    Read more »
  8. What Antoninus Pius did as emperor

    What Antoninus Pius did as emperor

    Antoninus Pius was born near Lanuvium in A.D. 86. As he grew up, he started serving as a quaestor. This was commonly known as a public official. In Ancient Rome it was also an elected position. Antoninus had great success performing his various duties.

     

    He worked with ease under Emperor Hadrian reign. Consequently, Antoninus obtained the consulship in 120 A.D. Because Emperor Hadrian had no immediate successor he decided to adopt Antoninus on February 25th, 138 A.D. This was only months before Hadrian died of congestive heart failure.

     

    Antoninus was suddenly thrust into position to rule the Roman Empire. What Antoninus Pius did as emperor is best understood if we take a closer look at what he didn't do. He didn't lead the country into war. Throughout his reign Emperor Antoninus carried out the continuation of a peaceful state.

    Read more »
  9. Rare Ancient Roman Coins To Own

    Rare Ancient Roman Coins To Own

    Rare Ancient Roman Coins to own date back over 2,000 years. They have become very popular. Many investors and collector are anxious to collect and own them today. Holding something that was around so long ago is a feeling like no other. A base of collectors from all over the world have evolved. They enjoy putting together collections of ancient coins that they find very special, enjoyable, and potentially highly profitable.

    Of course, not all Ancient Coins are as rare as others. Truly rare Ancient Roman Coins are far and few between. Ever Increasing demand puts pressure on the extremely limited supplies. Those in excellent condition, that only have a smaller number known to exist, are ones to own. The most desirable are worth the most money.

     

    One of the most famous

    Read more »
  10. Why buy a Coson Gold Stater?

    Why buy a Coson Gold Stater?

    This Beautiful Ancient Coin

     

    If some asks "why buy a Coson Gold Stater" you can answer, because you're looking for remarkable ancient coins. One that is gold and has tremendous value in the ancient coin market place. You can also tell them to just take a look at this beautiful ancient coin. Then show them the Coson Gold Staters in Mint State 4x4 Condition.

     

    Some Coin Highlights

     

    • These coins have a quarter of an ounce of pure gold and were struck around 2,000 years ago.
    • They are certified by NGC, a branch of Numismatic Guaranty Corporation devoted to ancient coins.
    • They are in mint state condition and for under $2,000.

     

    What

    Read more »
Page