Rare Gold Coins

  1. Who Were The Thracians?

    Who Were The Thracians?

    When talking about groups of people in ancient times some people wonder "who were the Thracians?" It is curious that many don't know much about them even though they were an Indo-European people who dominated a large area of Eastern Europe. They inhabited what today is modern day Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece. In fact, they occupied this area for much of antiquity.

    We can find some of the earliest literary references of the Thracians from the Iliad. The epic poem of Homer referenced the Trojan War and King Rhesus who was a local Thracian ruler. The problem about Thracians is that they were divided between multiple tribes. They all had their own tribal identity and basically did things differently. Interestingly, The Thracians did not describe themselves by name. The term Thrace and Thracians were names given to them by the Greeks.

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  2. US gold coin redesign

    US gold coin redesign

    US President Theodore Roosevelt was tired of minting the same old gold eagle and double eagle coins. To paraphrase President Roosevelt, the country needed a US gold coin redesign. In short, he had long been complaining that US coins lacked artistic quality. In fact, he decided to hire a private sculptor to create a new design. Augustus Saint-Gaudens was chosen to redesign five denominations of US coinage that could be changed without an Act of Congress.

     

    Roosevelt's broad overhaul of the United States gold coins led to a new Lady Liberty. One wearing a traditional Native American Indian Headdress. In 1907, the new $10 coin with the new Lady Liberty wearing the Indian Headdress was unveiled. The coin became a huge success.

     

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  3. Three-Dollar Gold Piece

    Three-Dollar Gold Piece

    The rarest pre-1933 US gold coin is the Three-Dollar gold piece. To clarify, only 539,792 of them were produced according to the US Mint. The reason there were so few made is because the Three-Dollar gold coins were very unpopular. Basically, the public rejected them when they were introduced in 1854. Therefore, only small mintages of these coins were produced from 1854 to 1889. Similarly, They ended production after just 35 years. This total of just over half a million coins were produced at the US Mint facilities in Philadelphia, New Orleans, San Francisco and Dahlonega combined.

     

    Many of these 3 Dollar coins have been destroyed

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  4. Liberty $10 Gold Piece Worth

    Liberty $10 Gold Piece Worth

    The Liberty $10 gold piece's worth is a lot higher than just its face value. The rare coin market has been expanding in the past few years and the price of gold has been going up. The values of those holding onto Liberty $10 gold coins have also gone up. Today, a coin, even if it isn't a very rare one, can easily be worth a minimum of $821! Importantly, these coins are always popular, well loved, and in demand.

     

    However, if the Liberty $10 Gold Piece is a rarer coin, it can be worth much more. In our opinion, Pre-Civil War New Orleans Mint Eagles are undervalued in the current marketplace. Each coin contains just under a half-ounce of gold. They are fundamentally rare and beautiful pieces of US history and money.

     

    Liberty $10 Gold

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  5. Who owns the gold from the S.S. Central America?

    Who owns the gold from the S.S. Central America?

    There is no easy answer regarding who owns the gold from the S.S. Central America. The S.S. Central America, also know as the “Ship of Gold,” sank in a hurricane off the cost of the Carolinas with tons of gold from the San Francisco mint. In addition, there were gold coins, ingots, gold dust, and various bullion coins from the California Gold Rush that went down with the ship. In fact, the enormous loss of gold has been described as the greatest economic catastrophe in all of U.S. maritime history.

     

    I took over a 150 years to find the Ship of Gold sitting at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. The ship was located by the Columbus-America Discovery Group of Ohio, led by Tommy Gre

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  6. Can I buy gold ingots?

    Can I buy gold ingots?

    Occasionally customers call and ask us, "Can I buy gold ingots?" Many of them are especially interested in gold ingots from the SS Central American Shipwreck. What's interesting is where these gold ingots came from—The California Gold rush. It was a very fascinating time in American History.

     

    This is when massive fortunes were made and lost. Most importantly, gold remained a testament to this exciting time period. Prospectors were frantic to discover it. They took gold nuggets in rocks to gold dust in rivers. This raw gold was turned into gold coins and bars—called ingots.

     

    The gold was first mined in the California Hills and then taken to private refiners or assayers. They would weigh the gold and estimate its purity. Furthermore, it paid the miners for their hard work. The gold was amassed by the refiners, so the assayers could melt and ref

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  7. Macedonian Empire Gold Stater

    Macedonian Empire Gold Stater

    Various regions of ancient Greece utilized Staters as coinage. Importantly, in the beginning most of them were made of silver. However, it was ancient Macedonian Empire that first started using Gold Staters. The best known ancient Macedonian Empire Gold Stater was the one from King Philip II of Macedon—340 BC.

    It is hard to believe that these coins were struck by hand. Moreover, how could such a beautiful coin be created over 2,400 years ago? Each coin was a hand made example of ancient art. It is no wonder that some of these coins are still considered the most beautiful coins ever made. They were minted in Pella, Macedonia, most importantly known as the birthplace of both King Philip II and his son Alexander the Great.

    Philip will always be remembered in history as a brilliant military leader. His victories actually help to shape G

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  8. Rare $20 Double Eagle Gold Coin

    Rare $20 Double Eagle Gold Coin

    People often ask us what a rare $20 Double Eagle Gold Coin is worth. Well, a fashion mogul Stuart Weitzman's 1933 Double Eagle gold coin sold for $18.9 million at Sotheby's Auction in New York! It shattered the world auction record. In fact, it nearly doubled the record for the world's most valuable coin ever sold.

     

    But, why was this rare $20 Double Eagle Gold Coin worth so much? It was because the 1933 edition of the Double Eagle never entered circulation. Consequently, nearly all of them were returned to the US government and melted down. There were only a few of these coins that somehow entered the market. Therefore, the Secret Service in 1944 declared any of them owned by collectors would be prosecuted. Because, they considered these coins

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  9. Why buy a Coson Gold Stater?

    Why buy a Coson Gold Stater?

    This Beautiful Ancient Coin

     

    If some asks "why buy a Coson Gold Stater" you can answer, because you're looking for remarkable ancient coins. One that is gold and has tremendous value in the ancient coin market place. You can also tell them to just take a look at this beautiful ancient coin. Then show them the Coson Gold Staters in Mint State 4x4 Condition.

     

    Some Coin Highlights

     

    • These coins have a quarter of an ounce of pure gold and were struck around 2,000 years ago.
    • They are certified by NGC, a branch of Numismatic Guaranty Corporation devoted to ancient coins.
    • They are in mint state condition and for under $2,000.

     

    What

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  10. What is a Gold Aureus?

    What is a Gold Aureus?

    A gold coin of ancient Rome

     

    What is a Gold Aureus? The Julius Caesar Gold Aureus was a gold coin of ancient Rome originally valued at 25 pure Silver Denarii. From the 1st century BC to the beginning of the 4th century AD the aureus was commonly struck. It later was replaced by the Solidus. This gold Aureus was struck Caesar during the Roman Republican period under Julius Caesar by Praetor A. Hirtius.

     

    The aureus was heavier than the same size denarius because gold is more dense than silver. Before Julius Caesar became emperor of Rome the gold aureus wasn't very common. It was Caesar's extravagant spending and trying to gain favor with the social elitist that

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